• Complete the fieldwork requirements for A level students within physical and human environments.
  • Students will spend time forming an independent investigation and collecting data for Investigative geography; worth 20% of final A-level mark.
  • Support and guidance is given from FSC’s field teachers before and after students collect their data. Students will have time to visit the location of their investigation, develop their knowledge before finalising the independent investigation title. They will then collect all the data needed, with time given to reflect and improve the methodology.
  • The focus for Investigative geography can be drawn from any aspect of the specification, in discussion with Centre staff.

Example Timetable

Day 1

Morning

Arrive Midday
  • Students will be greeted by FSC staff, with a welcome talk followed by a brief tour of the centre and the local area.
  • Outline of the Course
  • Allocation of wellies/waterproofs.

Afternoon

Introduction to the Fieldwork NEA

Students will visit a local field site which will provide the backdrop to explore how to ask geographical questions, design sampling strategies and build research proposals. This session will also set the scene for the rest of the course, as students are introduced to an outline of the stages of an investigation and mark scheme, including the expectations relating to independence and teacher guidance.

Evening

Research Workshop

During this workshop students will be introduced to a wide range of potential secondary data sources and information. They will explore how secondary research can be used to justify a research aim, question or hypothesis. In addition students will be given the opportunity to explore online and hard copy resources containing primary data collection and sampling techniques.

Day 2

Morning

Fieldwork Environment (1)

During this session students will visit a selection of local contrasting physical environments and explore the possible fieldwork locations and themes that could arise. Students will be introduced to a range of possible fieldwork methods and data collection techniques and will discuss possible ideas for geographical research questions. Students will also discuss what makes a ‘good’ or valuable primary data and develop their understanding of how to select a fieldwork technique.

Afternoon

Data Presentation Workshop

Focusing on GIS as well as traditional presentation methods students will be introduced to a selection of possible methods that they may wish to incorporate within their research project.

Evening

Statistics Workshop

During this evening session, students will be introduced to a selection of possible statistical techniques and explore how these can be useful in a research project.

Day 3

Morning and Afternoon

Fieldwork Environment (2)

Building on yesterday’s introduction, students will visit a selection of different environments, focusing more on a human theme. Students will be introduced to a range of possible fieldwork methods and data collection techniques and will discuss possible ideas for geographical research questions. Students will also discuss what makes a ‘good’ or valuable primary data and develop their understanding of how to select a fieldwork technique.

Evening

Independent Titles and Secondary Research

During this evening session, students will independently finalise the draft titles of their investigation. Teachers will have the opportunity to confirm that students’ titles have the potential to meet the assessment criteria and provide any general guidance necessary. Students will develop their justification and contextualisation of how their enquiry will help them answer their title. In addition, using FSC databases and research facilities, students will independently select any secondary data sources they may require.

Day 4

Morning

Methodology and Sampling Planning

During this session students will plan and select their methodologies and sampling strategies, collaborating in groups if needed, to plan how they will collect the primary field data they need.

Afternoon

Primary Data Collection

Students will spend the day in their chosen location collecting the data they require, they may work individually or in groups, supervised by FSC and school staff.

Evening

Primary Data Collation

During this evening session students will ensure that they have a personal set of the data required for their project, to ensure that they can move on the presentation stage of the investigation independently. Supporting ICT and GIS packages will be available for students to use if needed.

Day 5

Morning

Independent Data Presentation and Secondary Research

During this session, students will work independently on the next aspect of their research project. Some students will want to continue with some secondary or primary research, while others may want to start to present their data. FSC staff will provide technical support on the research databases, GIS and ICT that students may need to use.

Afternoon

Depart at Midday

A final farewell from FSC staff as the students depart at midday.

Please note: to ensure safe and quality learning experiences for students, the timetable may alter depending on weather conditions and local factors at centres.

How this course fulfills the specification

2c: Content of Physical systems (H481/01)

Topic 1.1 - Landscape Systems
1.1.1 Option A - Coastal Landscapes

1. How can coastal landscapes be viewed as systems?
1.a Coastal landscapes can be viewed as systems.
1.b Coastal landscape systems are influenced by a range of physical factors.
1.c Coastal sediment is supplied from a variety of sources.

2. How are coastal landforms developed?
2.a Coastal landforms develop due to a variety of interconnected climatic and geomorphic processes.
2.b Coastal landforms are inter-related and together make up characteristic landscapes.

4. How does human activity cause change within coastal landscape systems?
4.a Human activity intentionally causes change within coastal landscape systems.
4.b Economic development unintentionally causes change within coastal landscape systems.

1.1.2 Option B - Glaciated Landscapes

1. How can glaciated landscapes be viewed as systems?
1.a Glaciated landscapes can be viewed as systems.
1.b Glaciated landscapes are influenced by a range of physical factors.
1.c There are different types of glacier and glacier movement.

2. How are glacial landforms developed?
2.a Glacial landforms develop due to a variety of interconnected climatic and geomorphic processes.
2.b Glacial landforms are inter-related and together make up characteristic landscapes.

3. How do glacial landforms evolve over time as climate changes?
3.a Glacio-fluvial landforms exist as a result of climate change at the end of glacial periods.
3.b Periglacial landforms exist as a result of climate change before and/or after glacial periods.

4. How does human activity cause change within glaciated and periglacial landscape systems?
4.a Human activity causes change within periglacial landscape systems.

Topic 1.2 - Earth’s Life Support Systems

1. How important are water and carbon to life on earth?
1.a Water and carbon support life on earth and move between the land, oceans and atmosphere.
1.b The carbon and water cycles are systems with inputs, outputs and stores.
1.c The carbon and water cycles have distinctive processes and pathways that operate within them.

3. How much change occurs over time in the water and carbon cycles?
3.a Human factors can disturb and enhance the natural processes and stores in the water and carbon cycles.
3.b The pathways and processes which control the cycling of water and carbon vary over time.

4. To what extent are the water and carbon cycles linked?4.a The two cycles are linked and interdependent.
4.b The global implications of water and carbon management.

2c: Content of Geographical debates (H481/03)

Topic 3.1 - Climate Change

4. In what ways can humans respond to climate change?
4.c Mitigation and adaptation are complementary strategies for reducing and managing the risks of climate change.

Topic 3.3 - Exploring Oceans

2. What are the opportunities and threats arising from the use of ocean resources?
2.a Biological resources within oceans can be used in sustainable or unsustainable ways.
2.b The use of ocean energy and mineral resources is a contested issue.
2.c Governing the oceans poses issues for the management of resources.

3. How and in what ways do human activities pollute oceans?
3.a There are a variety of pollutants that affect the ocean system.
3.b Off-shore oil production and transport poses threats for people and the environment.

4. How is climate change impacting the ocean system?
4.a Climate change is altering the nature of the ocean’s water.
4.b Climate change is altering sea levels.

Topic 3.4 - Future of Food

1. What is food security and why is it of global significance?
1.b Food is a precious resource and global food production can be viewed as an interconnected system.

4. How do food production and security issues impact people and the physical environment?
4.a Imbalance in the global food system has physical and human impacts

2c: Content of Human interactions (H481/02)

Topic 2.1 - Changing Spaces; Making Places

1. What’s in a place?
1.a Places are multi-faceted, shaped by shifting flows and connections which change over time.

2. How do we understand place?
2.a People see, experience and understand place in different ways, this can also change over time.
2.b Places are represented through a variety of contrasting formal and informal agencies.

3. How does economic change influence patterns of social inequality in places?
3.a The distribution of resources, wealth and opportunities are not evenly spread within and between places.
3.b Processes of economic change can create opportunities for some while creating and exacerbating social inequality for others.
3.c Social inequality impacts people and places in different ways.

4. Who are the players that influence economic change in places?
4.a Places are influenced by a range of players operating at different scales.

5. How are places created through placemaking processes?
5.a Place is produced in a variety of ways at different scales.
5.b The placemaking process of rebranding constructs a different place meaning through reimaging and regeneration.
5.c Making a successful place requires planning and design.

Added value of this course

  • Develop personal skills
  • Have fun
  • Be inspired by a passion for the subject
  • Build friendships

Why Choose FSC?

  • Expert tuition by fully trained staff

  • Rigorous and proven health and safety procedures including 24 hour emergency cover

  • Free places for visiting staff in a ratio of 1 to 12 students

  • Specialist equipment and exclusive access to specially developed resources

  • Personal and travel insurance included

  • Access to risk assessments