• Complete fieldwork in both physical and human contexts to fully prepare for the Paper 3 exam: Geographical Skills: Section B.
  • Options to complete case studies in Rivers or Coasts, Cities and Flooding.
  • Develop the geographical, mathematical and statistical skills which are integrated within all areas of assessment in a real world situation with contextualised data students have collected themselves.

This course will use the six stages of fieldwork enquiry, listed below:

  • understanding of the kinds of question capable of being investigated through fieldwork and an understanding of the geographical enquiry processes
  • appropriate to investigate these
  • understanding of the range of techniques and methods used in fieldwork, including observation and different kinds of measurement
  • processing and presenting fieldwork data in various ways including maps, graphs and diagrams
  • analysing and explaining data collected in the field using knowledge of relevant geographical case studies and theories
  • drawing evidenced conclusions and summaries from fieldwork transcripts and data
  • reflecting critically on fieldwork data, methods used, conclusions drawn and knowledge gained.

Example Timetable

Day One
Afternoon

Arrive for Evening Meal
Students will be greeted by FSC staff, with a welcome talk followed by a brief tour of the Centre and the local area.
Outline of the Course
Allocation of wellies/waterproofs.

Evening

Course Introduction
In this session students will be introduced to the fieldwork and locations they will meet in the rest of the course. They will develop their knowledge and understanding of the enquiry process and set their expectations for their physical and human fieldwork.

Day Two
Morning

Physical Fieldwork - Landscapes of the UK: Case Study
Students will visit one of the UK’s most inspiring fieldwork examples of a river or coastal landscape. FSC field teachers will carefully facilitate students’ investigations of the processes and
systems that play a part in this iconic scenery, including their part in the system. Students will be enthused and develop confidence in exploring new surroundings and learning in an unfamiliar
environment.
Choose one from the below geographical enquiries:
• River Landforms and Management
• Coastal Landscapes (Landforms and Management)

Evening

Physical Fieldwork Conclusions
Using historical data sets, students will contextualise their own data in a wider temporal and spatial environment. They will develop their skills in data presentation and analysis, preparing
their fieldwork notes to support them in exam revision.

Day Three
Morning

Human Fieldwork - People of the UK
Students will be immersed in a dynamic urban environment. FSC field teachers will bring the rich
complexities of the human environment into focus engaging students’ curiosity and revealing towns
and cities to be the diverse and interconnected systems that they are.
Choose one from the below geographical enquiries:
• City Case Study
• Urban Trends

Evening

Human Fieldwork Conclusions
Using historical data sets, students will contextualise their own data in a wider temporal and spatial environment. They will develop their skills in data presentation and analysis, preparing
their fieldwork notes to support them in exam revision.

Day Four
Morning

Peoples’ Interaction with the Physical Environment: Flooding Case Study
Students will focus on the interaction between people and the physical environment through one of the options below. Using the six stages of the enquiry process as a framework the fieldwork will draw out the highly interconnected nature of the world in which we play a part.

Afternoon

Depart after lunch
Using historical data sets, students will contextualise their own data in a wider temporal and spatial environment. They will develop their skills in data presentation and analysis, preparing
their fieldwork notes to support them in exam revision.

Please note:
To ensure safe and quality learning experiences for students, the timetable may alter depending on weather conditions and local factors at Centres.

How this course fulfills the specification

Specification Links
1.1 Landscapes of the UK
1.1.3 Rivers create a range of landforms which change with distance from their source within a river basin.
The formation of river landforms (waterfall, gorge, V-shaped valley, floodplain, levee, meander, ox-bow lake).
1.1.5 Landscapes are dynamic and differ depending on their geology, climate and human activity.
River basin: The geomorphic processes operating at different scales and how they are influenced by geology and climate.
River basin: Landforms associated with the area.
River basin: How human activity, including management, works in combination with geomorphic processes to impact the landscape.

 

Learning Opportunities
Coastal landscape systems are some of the most dynamic and fascinating in the UK, showcasing the complex interactions between the land and sea. To hold this
complexity the idea that maintaining balance requires giving and taking will be explored. This investigation focuses on the characteristics and management of a
coastal location, set in the context of the bigger coastal system. Students will have the opportunity to investigate a rocky coastal environment and the formation
of erosional features making up this landscape. They will investigate the geology and relief of the coastline, together with collecting data on the beach sediment and
profiles. Students will use the shoreline management plans and a range of fieldwork methods to consider how the threat of coastal erosion has been mitigated or
reduced. They will consider the management strategy that is applied to the location and reasons behind this particular strategy in light of sea level rise predictions.
Students will also consider the effectiveness of the coastal defences and relate this to the geomorphic processes involved in shaping the coastline, the impacts on
the coastal landforms and the balance of the system. A variety of numerical and cartographic skills including interpreting geo-spatial data in a GIS framework will
be used.
Specification Links
1.1 Landscapes of the UK
1.1.5 Landscapes are dynamic and differ depending on their geology, climate and human activity.
Coastal landscapes: The geomorphic processes operating at different scales and how they are influenced by geology and climate.
Coastal landscapes: Landforms associated with the area.
Coastal landscapes: How human activity, including management, works in combination with geomorphic processes to impact the landscape.

 

Learning Opportunities
This follow-up session will be specific to the enquiry that the students have completed during the day. They will focus on:
• Selecting appropriate ways of processing and presenting their fieldwork data.
• Describing, analysing and explaining their fieldwork data.
• Drawing evidenced conclusions.
• Critically reflecting on the fieldwork data.
A range of presentation methods will be introduced and approaches to identify the most appropriate will be discussed. Students will analyse their data, finding
connections and building logical chains of reasoning, building their knowledge using geographical theories. They will improve their skills assessed during AO3: Applying
knowledge and understanding to interpret, analysis and evaluate geographical information and issues to make judgements. During each follow-up session evidenced
conclusions will be modelled for students, relating these to the original aims of the enquiries and detailed evaluations will include limitations of data collection and
reliability of conclusions.
Specification Links
2c Content of Geographical Skills
3 Geographical Skills
3.1 Cartographic skills
Select, adapt and construct maps, using appropriate scales and annotations, to present information.
Interpret cross-sections of transects.
Use and understand coordinates, scale and distance.
Extract, interpret, analyse and evaluate information.
Describe, interpret and analyse geo-spatial data presented in a GIS framework.
3.2 Graphical skills
Select, adapt and construct appropriate graphs and charts, using appropriate scales and annotations to present information.
Extract, interpret, analyse and evaluate information.
3.3 Numerical and statistical skills
Demonstrate an understanding of number, area and scale.
Use appropriate measures of central tendency, spread and cumulative frequency including, median, mean, range, quartiles and inter-quartile range, mode and modal
class.
Calculate and understand percentages (increase and decrease) and percentiles.
Interpret tables of data.
Describe relationships in bivariate data.
Sketch trend lines through scatter plots.
Make predictions; interpolate and extrapolate trends from data.
Draw and justify conclusions from numerical and statistical data.

Learning Opportunities
Urban environments are rapidly becoming the preferred global habitat of human beings, and are home to over 80% of the UK population. This is changing the
way we function as a global society, and is closely linked to rapid global population growth and issues of inequality. Students will visit a local city or urban area
and investigate the ways in which peoples’ lives are affected by aspects such as culture, housing, leisure and consumption. Students will develop questions which
are suitable for investigation and use a range of techniques and methods to collect data, including questionnaires. Different stakeholder group perceptions will be
examined, as well as mapping of different aspects such as access to leisure facilities housing types and cultural elements of the city.

Specification Links
1.2 People of the UK
1.2.6 Cities have distinct challenges and ways of life, influenced by its people, culture and geography.
Case study of one major city in the UK including the influences of:
the city within its region, the country and the wider world migration (national and international) and its impact on the city’s growth and character
the ways of life within the city, such as culture, ethnicity, housing, leisure and consumption
contemporary challenges that affect urban change, including housing availability, transport provision and waste management
sustainable strategies to overcome one of the city’s challenges

 

Learning Opportunities
Visiting a dynamic and thriving urban area, students will consider the causes and consequences of suburbanisation and urbanisation. They will contrast this with an
exploration of different urban and rural areas to develop their understanding of counter-urbanisation.
Fieldwork may include:
• GIS base map surveys
• Building, land and traffic studies
• Functions and services auditing
• Questionnaires
Secondary data may include:
• Census data
• Land registry information
• Crime data
Specification Links
1.2 People of the UK
1.2.6 There are causes for and consequences of urban trends in the UK.
Overview of the causes for contrasting urban trends in the UK, including suburbanisation, counter-urbanisation and re-urbanisation.
Outline of the social, economic and environmental consequences of contrasting urban trends in the UK, including suburbanisation, counter-urbanisation and
re-urbanisation.

 

Learning Opportunities
This follow-up session will be specific to the enquiry that the students have completed during the day. They will focus on:
• Selecting appropriate ways of processing and presenting their fieldwork data.
• Describing, analysing and explaining their fieldwork data.
• Drawing evidenced conclusions.
• Critically reflecting on the fieldwork data.
A range of presentation methods will be introduced and approaches to identify the most appropriate will be discussed. Students will analyse their data, finding
connections and building logical chains of reasoning, building their knowledge using geographical theories. They will improve their skills assessed during AO3: Applying
knowledge and understanding to interpret, analysis and evaluate geographical information and issues to make judgements. During each follow-up session evidenced
conclusions will be modelled for students, relating these to the original aims of the enquiries and detailed evaluations will include limitations of data collection and
reliability of conclusions.
Specification Links
2c Content of Geographical Skills
3 Geographical Skills
3.1 Cartographic skills
Select, adapt and construct maps, using appropriate scales and annotations, to present information.
Describe, interpret and analyse geo-spatial data presented in a GIS framework.
3.2 Graphical skills
Select, adapt and construct appropriate graphs and charts, using appropriate scales and annotations to present information.
Effectively present and communicate data through graphs and charts.
Extract, interpret, analyse and evaluate information.
3.3 Numerical and statistical skills
Understand and correctly use appropriate measures of central tendency, spread and cumulative frequency including, median, mean, range, quartiles and inter-quartile
range, mode and modal class.
Interpret tables of data.
Describe relationships in bivariate data.
Sketch trend lines through scatter plots.
Draw estimated lines of best fit.
Make predictions; interpolate and extrapolate trends from data.
3.4 Other skills
Deconstruct, interpret, analyse and evaluate visual images including photographs, cartoons, pictures and diagrams.
Suggest improvements to, issues with or reasons for using maps, graphs, statistical techniques and visual sources, such as photographs and diagrams.

 

Learning Opportunities
In this session students will apply their knowledge of the enquiry process to a flood hazard event, considering both the physical aspects of the drainage basin
and human modified landscapes. The idea that small changes in land use or climate can have big impacts for flooding will be explored. This will be investigated
on a local-scale through a series of storm simulation experiments, together with a series of GIS visualisations of the drainage basin. Students will investigate the
consequences of, and responses to a specific event, through secondary data, role play and research resources, as well as a site visit to collect field data.
Students will specifically focus on:
• Gaining an understanding of the interactions between people and environments.
• Inter-relationships between geographical ideas and issues in both human and physical aspects.
• Exploring the interconnections between human responses to a flood event and the social structure surrounding the environment.
Specification Links
1.3 UK Environmental Challenges
1.3.2 Extreme flood hazard events are becoming more commonplace in the UK.
Case study of one UK flood event caused by extreme weather conditions including:
• causes of the flood event, including the extreme weather conditions which led to the event
• effects of the flood event on people and the environment
• the management of the flood event at a variety of scales.

 

 

Added value of this course

  • Develop personal skills
  • Have fun
  • Be inspired by a passion for the subject
  • Build friendships

Why Choose FSC?

  • Expert tuition by fully trained staff

  • Stunning locations across the UK

  • Outstanding curriculum knowledge

  • Rigorous health and safety procedures

  • Support before and after your visit

  • Free places for visiting staff