• Complete the fieldwork requirements for AS level students within physical and human environments.
  • Prepare AS level students for AO3 of Paper 1: Landscape and Place exam, worth 21% of their total marks.
  • Cover a choice of physical geography specification content for AS fieldwork in Topic 1.1 Landscape Systems; either 1.1.1 Coastal Landscapes or 1.1.2 Glaciated Landscapes.
  • Cover human geography specification content for AS fieldwork in Topic 1.2 Changing Spaces; Making Places.
  • For those going on to A level, this course will provide contextualised learning in inspiring real world environments to develop their geographical understanding for the A level examinations.

Example Timetable

Day 1

Morning

Arrive Midday
  • Students will be greeted by FSC staff, with a welcome talk followed by a brief tour of the Centre and the local area.
  • Outline of the Course
  • Allocation of wellies/waterproofs.

Afternoon

Topic 1.1 Landscape Systems

Choose one from:

Coastal Landscapes and Systems

Students will explore how a coastal landscape can be viewed as a system and how it is influenced by a range of physical factors. Using primary and secondary data collection, students will assess the inputs and processes taking place at the coastline that create the coastal system.

Glacial Landscape Systems

Developing a sense of place in an inspiring local environment, students will gain an understanding of glacial systems and their role in shaping the present landscape. They will also explore the chronology of events that have shaped the landscape, and the influence of physical factors on these events.

Evening

Topic 1.1 Landscape Systems

Choose one from:

Data Analysis and Evaluation - Coasts

Utilising existing knowledge relevant to the fieldwork undertaken, students will make sense of their fieldwork observations, writing a coherent analysis of their findings and results. They will evaluate and reflect on their fieldwork investigations, justifying their conclusions and linking these to the aims or hypothesis of the day. A range of geographical and statistical skills will be covered.

Landscape Interpretation - Glacial Landscape Systems

Students will use mapping and remote sensing to extend understanding of the present landscape through exploring the local and global physical factors influencing the glacial systems of the past.

Day 2

Morning and Afternoon

Topic 1.1 Landscape Systems

Choose one from:

Development of Coastal Landforms

Using their knowledge of the systems that influence processes on a coastline, students will develop their understanding of the character of the coastline and how it has developed. They will analyse the character of the coastline by determining the possible reasons behind the development of the distinctive landforms of erosion and depositions.

The UK’s Glaciated Uplands

A full fieldwork day where students explore an awe-inspiring post-glacial environment, piecing together the processes and chronology that has created the landscape they see today. Students will explore the impact of ice on the landscape, observing landforms such as corries, aretes and terminal moraines, which have resulted from interactions between geology and erosional and depositional processes. Through direct observation and use of maps or aerial photos, students will gain knowledge of a number of glaciated environment landforms, including the processes that led to their creation.

Evening

Topic 1.1 Landscape Systems

Choose one from:

Coastal Case Study:

Having identified the systems and characteristics of their chosen coastline, students will develop their findings into a case study of a high/low energy coast.

Local Data in the Global Picture - Upland Glaciation

Students will explore the link between impact of former glaciers and ice sheets on the UK landscape and the consequences of ongoing deglaciation in other global settings. The analysis of their local primary data and global secondary data through GIS will give meaning to the fieldwork on a local and global scale.

Day 3

Morning

Topic 1.1 Landscape Systems

Choose one from:

Coastal Landscape Systems and Humans

Focusing on a local coastal management case study, students will review their understanding of coastal features, processes and systems. Human activity can cause change within the coastal system, as can economic development. Students will investigate the impacts on the flows of material, processes and/or energy through the coastal system.

The UK’s Glaciated Lowlands

Students will follow the path of a former ice flow into the lowlands to explore the features formed by glacial and fluvioglacial deposition. They will investigate the characteristics of sediments in depositional landforms, and the role of climate change and resource extraction, in their modification.

Afternoon

Topic 1.2 Changing Spaces; Making Places
How is a Place Seen Differently by Different People?

What is place? Place vs. space. How is a place seen differently by different people? The purpose of the afternoon is to engage students to explore place and the different ways the same place can be seen and used. This has implications for inclusivity, sustainability, place resilience and interdependence. These ideas will be explored through a centre based session, using the grounds and visitors to consider the way spaces are planned, used, viewed and shaped by people and flows.

Evening

Topic 1.2 Changing Spaces; Making Places
Qualitative Data / Information Analysis and Evaluation Workshop.

A range of different tools will be used including coding, textual and photo analysis to interrogate the results from the previous practical research session. Recognition of the values laden nature of this work will be made, with consideration of the part played by personal values and the values being engaged by place in our daily lives and this work. These skills will be invaluable in interpreting outcomes of this contemporary, complex topic.

Day 4

Morning and Afternoon

Topic 1.2 Changing Spaces; Making Places

Choose one from:

Representations of Place

Understanding Informal and Formal Representation, Connections and Flows through Fieldwork and Research. The concept of place is explored in depth by examining how people perceive, interact and move within places in different ways based on their identity, including age, gender, sexuality, religion and role.

Social Inequality

Exploring Indicators and First-hand Evidence to Reveal Patterns of Social Inequality in a Place. Students will investigate how social inequality is characterised by unequal opportunities and rewards for different social statuses within a place, including unequal distributions of goods, wealth and opportunities.

Evening

Topic 1.2 Changing Spaces; Making Places

Choose one from:

Analysing Place Representation

Identify how formal and statistical representations of a place, such as geodemographic (including census) and geospatial data, contrasts with informal representations.

Social Inequality Data Analysis

A range of secondary data e.g. Indexes of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) will be mapped and combined with the fieldwork data to better understand how social inequality impacts upon peoples’ daily lives in different ways.

Day 5

Morning

Topic 1.2 Changing Spaces; Making Places
Evaluating Local Placemaking (including Rebranding, Reimaging and Regeneration)

Why do people attempt to rebrand areas? Through exploring the concept of placemaking students will investigate how community groups, local and national government and other actors/ organisations including architects and planners attempt to create and present places in a particular way.

Afternoon

Depart at Midday

A final farewell from FSC staff as the students depart at lunchtime

Please note: to ensure safe and quality learning experiences for students, the timetable may alter depending on weather conditions and local factors at centres.

Added value of this course

  • Develop personal skills
  • Have fun
  • Be inspired by a passion for the subject
  • Build friendships

Why Choose FSC?

  • Expert tuition by fully trained staff

  • Stunning locations across the UK

  • Outstanding curriculum knowledge

  • Rigorous health and safety procedures

  • Support before and after your visit

  • Free places for visiting staff