Virtual Meet Ups (VMUs)

These Virtual Meet Ups are an opportunity to keep in touch and share skills and knowledge during lockdown. They are short natural history webinars, comprising of a 30-40 minute talk from either an FSC BioLinks team member or a guest speaker, followed by a question and answer session. We host them on Zoom, we will send out joining instructions on the day of the event. Sign up to the FSC BioLinks newsletter to find out about other online learning opportunities here.

Exploring Earthworm Ecology

The UK is home to 29 different species of earthworm, and these come in a variety of colours and sizes. Different earthworms can be found in different habitats, with British earthworms breaking down into 4 broad ecological groupings. Keiron (FSC BioLinks Project Manager) will discuss how to recognise the four ‘ecotypes’ by observing the behaviour, size and colour of an earthworm, as well as introducing some of the lesser known specialist earthworms that you can find in unusual places.

 

Cost

The FSC BioLinks project is funded by the Field Studies Council and National Lottery Heritage Fund. Our Virtual Meet Ups are made available to all at no cost. However, we’ve listened to your feedback and added an optional fee for those that would like the opportunity to contribute financially to our work to provide adult learning opportunities for a range of audiences.

Discounted – select if you would like to attend at no cost

Attendee – select if you would like to attend at a cost of £5

 

 

Header photo © Bob Kemp

Tutor: Keiron Brown

Keiron Derek Brown first became interested in invertebrates during a field-based entomology module at university and went on to volunteer on soil biodiversity research projects at the Natural History Museum (London). This included sorting samples of invertebrates to order level and sampling invertebrates across the New Forest in Hampshire and the Malaysian rainforests of Borneo.

Keiron now manages the FSC BioLinks project, with the aim of inspiring amateur naturalists to take up the identification and recording of invertebrate groups that are often forgotten and rarely recorded. In his spare time he is an active member, and trustee, of the London Natural History Society and is the national recorder for earthworms (running the National Earthworm Recording Scheme on behalf of the Earthworm Society of Britain).

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